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Noctuidae - Dagger Moths, Noctuid Moths

 

Classification

 Kingdom: Animalia
 Phylum: Arthropoda
 Subphylum: Hexapoda
 Class: Insecta
 Order: Lepidoptera
 Family: Noctuidae

Cabbage MothThere are around 25,000 identified species of small to large moths in this family. Most of the moths in this family are dull in color, but some species have brightly colored hindwings.

They have threadlike antennae and are found in all parts of the world. Most species pupate in the soil. Most of the moths in this family are nocturnal and are attracted to light. Adults feed on the nectar of flowers. Most of the caterpillars in this family have very little hair or are smooth.

Cutworms are in this family. The caterpillars of cutworms live in the soil and can damage plants. They pull plants from the surface down into their burrows!

 

Cabbage LooperArmyworms and cabbage loopers are also in this family and can cause damage to crops. Cabbage loopers are also known as cabbage worms. They are called loopers because they hunch their bodies and move like inch worms. They are pale green with white stripes and feed on crops like cabbage, kale, turnips, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Armyworms are also a threat to crops. They get their name because the attack crops like an invading army! They feed on grass and grain crops and will eat everything in their path and then move on to the next food source.

 

 

World Status Key
Least ConcernLeast Concern Near ThreatenedNear Threatened VulnerableVulnerable EndangeredEndangered Critically EndangeredCritically Endangered extinct in the wildExtinct in Wild extinctExtinct
Status and range is taken from ICUN Redlist. If no status is listed, there is not enough data to establish status.

US Status Key
Threatened in USThreatened in US Threatened in New HampshireThreatened in NH Endangered in USEndangered in US Endangered in NHEndangered in NH IntroducedIntroduced
Status taken from US Fish and Wildlife and NH Fish and Game

  New Hampshire Species

 

 New Hampshire Species (cont.)

Splendid Dagger Moth - Acronicta superans
Meropleon diversiclor
Northern Burdock Borer Moth - Papaipema arctivorens
Brown-hooded Owlet - Cucullia convexipennis
Comstock's Sallow - Feralia comstocki
Bicolored Sallow - Sunira bicolorago
Xanthia tatago

  Common Looper Moth - Autographa precationis
Scalloped Sallow - Eucirroedia pampina
Iris Borer Moth - Macronoctua onusta
Anarta nigrolunata
Ipsilion Dart - Agrotis ipsilon
European Yellow Underwing - Noctua pronuba Introduced
Corn Earworm Moth - Helicoverpa zea

Additional Information

Key: profile Profile Photos Photos Video Video Audio Audio New Hampshire Species NH Species

Corn Earworm Moth - Helicoverpa zea profile Photos New Hampshire Species
The caterpillar of the corn earworm moth feeds on the outer end ears of corn.
Source: Butterflies and Moths of North America Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

European Yellow Underwing - Noctua pronuba profile Photos Introduced New Hampshire Species
The native range of the European yellow underwing is Eurasia and Africa. It was accidentally introduced to Nova Scotia in 1979.
Source: Butterflies and Moths of North America Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Iris Borer Moth - Macronoctua onusta profile Photos New Hampshire Species
The iris borer larva bores into a host plant.
Source: Butterflies and Moths of North America Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Scalloped Sallow - Eucirroedia pampina profile Photos New Hampshire Species
The scalloped swallow moth has rusty orange wings.
Source: Butterflies and Moths of North America Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Splendid Dagger Moth - Acronicta superans profile Photos New Hampshire Species
The splendid dagger moth caterpillar is found on apple, birch, cherry, hazelnut, mountain ash, and plum trees.
Source: Butterflies and Moths of North America Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No